Monthly Archives: November 2017

How to Parse Avaya Communication Manager data to a database for analysis – Part 3

Hello all!

This is a continuation of our discussion about pushing Avaya Communication Manager data into a database so you can analyze the results.

Here is part 1 where we connect to the Communication Manager through a perl script

Here is part 2 where we capture a bunch of data and parse it into useful tables

In this part, we push the data into a MySql database. The first step is to create the database. I typically use my own Linux workstation. You can ask your VM team for one. They take almost no resources and they’re open-source, so there are no licensing concerns. Therefore I typically have complete control of the repositories, database, and Apache instance. If you do not have the root password to your Linux workstation, then you might need help from your team with some of these steps.

We need to start with some assumptions here. So let’s assume you have followed parts 1 and 2 of this series and you have MySQL installed, okay?

Step 1 – create the database

Log into MySQL. These commands will create the database and user for this project. This user is called ‘scraper’ with a password of ‘crafty1876’

mysql> create database avaya;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.01 sec)

mysql> use avaya;
Database changed

mysql>create user scraper@localhost identified by 'crafty1876';
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.04 sec)

mysql>grant all on avaya.* to scraper@localhost;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql>exit

We exit the database and log back in with our new user. This ensures that the user works and has full access to the avaya database

[roger ~]# mysql -hlocalhost -uscraper -pcrafty1876 avaya

Now let’s create the tables we need. I always have a “drop table if exists” statement so I can tweak the table as much as I want and re-create it. This creates a keyvalues table and a display name table.

mysql> drop table if exists avaya_keyvalues;
Query OK, 0 rows affected, 1 warning (0.06 sec)

mysql]> create table avaya_keyvalues (
 id integer auto_increment primary key,
 active integer,
 key_name varchar(256),
 key_value varchar(256),
 record_status integer,
 created_on datetime,
 updated_on datetime,
 deactivated_on datetime
);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.11 sec)

mysql>drop table if exists avaya_display_name;
Query OK, 0 rows affected, 1 warning (0.06 sec)

mysql>create table avaya_display_name (
 station varchar(12) NOT NULL,
 name varchar(32),
 PRIMARY KEY (station)
);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.09 sec)

mysql>

Now we have a database and the empty tables we need. Since you have read part 1 and part 2 of this process, you should have a perl script generating your ‘keyvalue.txt’ file.

Step 2 – Push the keys and values into the database

We have a new perl script that takes the file of keys and values and puts it into the database. You can click here for a download the script. Just rename it to .pl. Here it is so you can see it. It is called keys2db.pl:

#!/usr/bin/perl

#provided as-is by in 2017 by RogerThePhoneGuy.com 
#This script reads a file of "key/value" pairs, and logs them to a database. If the value was changed or deleted, it logs that too
#meant to be used with keyval.php, which shows this data
#assumes there's a local mysql connection

use strict;
use DBI;

my $db;

sub db_open { 
	my $dsn = "DBI:mysql:avaya:localhost";
	my $user = "scraper";
	my $pass = "crafty1876";
	while (!($db)) {
		$db = DBI->connect($dsn, $user, $pass);
		sleep 1;
	}
}

sub db_close { 
	if($db) {
		$db->disconnect();
		sleep 1;
	}
	undef($db);
}

sub generic_replace { 
	my ($table, $fields, $values) = (@_);
	my $sql = "replace into $table ($fields) values ($values)";
	my $sth = $db->prepare($sql);
	if(!($sth->execute())) {
		print "WARNING - unable to replace with $sql\n";
	}
	$sth->finish();
}

sub generic_create { 
	my ($table, $fields, $values) = (@_);
	my $sql = "insert into $table ($fields) values ($values)";
	my $sth = $db->prepare($sql);
	if(!($sth->execute())) {
		print "WARNING - unable to insert with $sql\n";
	}
	$sth->finish();
}

sub generic_read {
	my ($select, $table, $where) = (@_);
	my @datarow;
	my $sql = "select $select from $table where $where limit 1";
	my $sth = $db->prepare($sql);
	if($sth->execute()) {
		@datarow = $sth->fetchrow_array();
	} else {
		print "unable to execute $sql\n";
	}
	$sth->finish();
	return $datarow[0];
}

sub generic_update {
	my ($table, $set, $where) = (@_);
	my $sql = "update $table set $set where $where";
	my $sth = $db->prepare($sql);
	if(!($sth->execute())) {
		print "WARNING - unable to update with $sql";
	}
	$sth->finish();
}

sub generic_delete {
	my ($table, $where) = (@_);
	my $sql = "delete from $table where $where";
	my $sth = $db->prepare($sql);
	if(!($sth->execute())) {
		print "WARNING - unable to update with $sql";
	}
	$sth->finish();
}

db_open();

my $counter = 0;
generic_update("avaya_keyvalues","record_status=9","active=1");
open SCRAPED, $ARGV[0];
while (my $line = ) {
	chomp($line);

	my ($key,$value) = split(/\t/,$line);
	my $id = generic_read("id", "avaya_keyvalues","active=1 and key_name='$key'") + 0;
	my $currvalue = generic_read("key_value", "avaya_keyvalues","active=1 and key_name='$key'");
	if($id > 0) {
		if($value ne $currvalue) {
			$value =~ s/'/\\'/g;
			generic_update("avaya_keyvalues","active=0,record_status=2,updated_on=now()","id=$id");
			my $fields = "id,active,key_name,key_value,record_status,created_on,updated_on,deactivated_on";
			my $values = "null,1,'$key','$value',1,now(),now(),null";
			generic_create("avaya_keyvalues", $fields, $values);	
		} else {
			generic_update("avaya_keyvalues","active=1,record_status=1","id=$id");
		}
	} else {
		$value =~ s/'/\\'/g;
		my $fields = "id,active,key_name,key_value,record_status,created_on,updated_on,deactivated_on";
		my $values = "null,1,'$key','$value',1,now(),now(),null";
		generic_create("avaya_keyvalues", $fields, $values);
	}
	if($key =~ /\.station\.(\d+)\.status/) {
		my $station = $1;
		my $name = '';
		if($value =~ /^(.+?) \(ip=/) {
			$name = $1;
		} elsif($value =~ /^(.+) \(unregistered/) {
			$name = $1;
		}
		$name =~ s/'/\\'/g;
		generic_replace("avaya_display_name","station,name","'$station','$name'");
	}
}
close SCRAPED;
generic_update("avaya_keyvalues","active=0,record_status=3,deactivated_on=now()","record_status=9");

my $create = "
drop table if exists avaya_keyvalues;
create table avaya_keyvalues (
	id integer auto_increment primary key,
	active integer,
	key_name varchar(256),
	key_value varchar(256),
	record_status integer,
	created_on datetime,
	updated_on datetime,
	deactivated_on datetime
);
";

#my @count = generic_read("count(*)","callrecord","1=1");
#print "count is " . $count[0] . "\n";
db_close();

This script is really basic. It just does these things:

  1. Line 88, It marks all records in the database as ‘old’
  2. Starting in line 90, It cycles through the keyvalues file and checks for records where the value has changed (line 97). It marks these as ‘changed’ and then inserts the new record. It marks the unchanged records as ‘unchanged’ (line 104).
  3. If the current value is not in the database, it inserts it (line 110)
  4. It also replaces the value of the display name in case we want to see all extensions and names later (line 121)
  5. Lastly, any record that was not touched through this loop is NOT in the text file. Does that make sense? So any record that is still marked ‘old’ in step 1 must have been deleted from the Avaya system. So we mark these records as ‘deleted’ (line 125).

When this script is done, we have a list of all active records in the database. We also have a list of old values and deleted values. This gives you a rolling history of all extensions in your database. I cannot tell you how handy it is to see a history of an extension. You can see when the IP address changes, when registration changes, when firmware changes, network region, etc. And of course when a station is deleted you still have a record of it. This is very handy.

For those of you interested in Perl, there are also a bunch of helpful database functions in here. I keep these in my back pocket and often copy/paste them to the next project.

To tie this new perl script into our ‘sanity.sh’ script from last time, we should now have this:

file=/home/roger/avaya/sanity/data/sanitycheck_`date +"%Y-%m-%d-%H-%M"`.txt
perl /home/roger/avaya/sanity/av.pl /home/ARES/randerson/avaya/sanity/la.pbx /home/roger/avaya/sanity/commands.txt >$file
perl /home/roger/avaya/sanity/sanity.pl $file > /home/roger/avaya/sanity/keyvalues.txt
perl /home/roger/avaya/sanity/keys2db.pl /home/roger/avaya/sanity/keyvalues.txt

At the end of this shell script, you should have a fresh copy of all stations in your PBX in the database! Ready for reading with a simple PHP script. That will be next time, and hopefully MUCH sooner than this post. Sorry for the delay.

Before I finish, I want to thank you for reading this. I recently “moved” from an Avaya environment to a Cisco environment, so I don’t have easy access to the Avaya environment anymore. I am using some copies of the scripts so if you find any syntax errors or something doesn’t work, please let me know and we’ll get it working.

Once I finish this series, I’ll show you a way to AUTOMATICALLY generate labels for the 96xx phones. That’s the most exciting thing I’ve been wanting to share with you!

Roger